How I track my life

Tracking quality of life with Reporter.

http://reporter-app.com

It’s designed to be used quickly, and often.

They don’t even store the data on their servers. It’s all yours and yours alone—on your phone and in the export. These are good people.

How I use Reporter

Reporter comes with a set of default questions about your sleep, how much coffee you drank, where you are, who you’re with, etc. Picking the right questions is crucial to getting value out of the app, and is by far the steepest part of the learning curve / barrier to adoption for the app.

Self-tracking is only useful if it leads to new self-knowledge and—ultimately—new action.

The key question in the list is the first one: “Is this quality time?”

The clincher

The third set of questions were added a few weeks after the first 2 mentioned above. They are the following:

  1. What circumstances are hindering quality time right now?

This third set of questions is what makes Reporter actionable. And therefore, what makes the tracking worth doing.

Encouraging circumstances
Hindering circumstances
  1. Analytics (catch-all name for work stuff)
  2. House of Cards (we did watch a lot of this in the last month)
  3. Chores (proof that I actually do like cleaning)
  4. My new half-brother (who I recently discovered via 23andme.com)
  5. Niko
  6. Relationships (& related conversations with Kellianne)
  7. Investing (something I’ve been researching a bit evenings and weekends)
  1. Talking with friends
  2. Talking with coworkers
  3. Cleaning (again!)
  4. Eating lunch
  5. Riding bikes
  6. Talking with Kellianne
  7. Walking
  1. Nobody (meaning I’m alone)
  2. Niko
  3. April Schiller (a friend who visited in February)
  4. Nicole (friend)
  5. Coworkers
  6. Bode and Brasa (friends)

Attempting to change a circumstance (tiredness) can have a more significant impact than attempting to change a behavior (bed time).

Behaviors at one part of the day impact circumstances throughout the day, and the set of circumstances then impact later behaviors, feelings, and decisions.

Author of Why Are We Yelling? — a book about the art of productive disagreement. I run 750words.com. Previously product at Patreon, Slack, Twitter, and Amazon.

Author of Why Are We Yelling? — a book about the art of productive disagreement. I run 750words.com. Previously product at Patreon, Slack, Twitter, and Amazon.